• Houses at Old Mill Beach, (Westport), 1954

    Hardie Gramatky

    18 x 23.5 inches

  • This artwork is available as a giclée art print on Arches watercolor paper. A high-definition, museum quality print that won't fade for up to 115 years.
  • $58.00 $145.00

  • Learn More about our museum quality giclée art prints. Please note: the CW logo is for online purposes only, and will not appear on the print.

Biography: Hardie Gramatky, N.A. (1907-1979) Born: Dallas, TX; Studied: Stanford University, Chouinard Art Institute (Los Angeles); Member: National Academy of Design, New York Water Color Club, American Watercolor Society, California Water Color Society. Hardie Gramatky was raised in Southern California. He studied art with F. Tolles Chamberlin, Clarence Hinkle, Pruett Carter...... read more

 
A California art print on Arches watercolor paper. 100% archival, and printed in HD.

"The story behind this painting is one of my favorites! Dad gave the painting and signed it "my very good friend Horace Godfrey", and a few years ago Mr. Godfrey's son sold it at auction and we were lucky enough to be able to buy it. Apparently Horace Godfrey was the man who he helped many Westport illustrators in the busy 1940s and 1950s from having to stop painting and bring their completed 'jobs' into the City. He delivered the illustrations to the art directors and picked up any work that needed revisions. Well, when we exhibited this watercolor in 2008 in the town library, a friend who just happens to still live next door to these houses told us 'the rest of the story'. The red house was a boarding house, and on the first floor lived Wally Cox ("Mr. Peepers" on TV) and in the garret room Arthur Miller and Marilyn Monroe lived before they got married while Arthur Miller was working on a play at the Westport Country Playhouse! Our friend (Wally Meyer) said that `you should have seen the neighborhood boys riding their bicycles around and around the parking lot [these houses face a town beach] trying to catch a glimpse of Marilyn Monroe!' The houses have been updated and painted, but they still are totally recognizable as the same houses. A nice bit of Westport history."

Courtesy of daughter-Linda Gramatky Smith